Last edited by Zulkizilkree
Thursday, July 23, 2020 | History

2 edition of Toxicology of carbon disulphide found in the catalog.

Toxicology of carbon disulphide

International Symposium on Toxicology of Carbon Disulphide (1966 Prague)

Toxicology of carbon disulphide

[Proceedings]

by International Symposium on Toxicology of Carbon Disulphide (1966 Prague)

  • 369 Want to read
  • 31 Currently reading

Published by Excerpta Medica Foundation .
Written in English


Edition Notes

Organized by Sub-Committee for Occupational Health in the Production of Artificial Fibres of Permanent Commission and International Association on OccupationalHealth.

Statementeds. H. Brieger, J. Teisinger.
ContributionsTeisinger, Jaroslav., Brieger, Heinrich., Permanent Commission and Internatinal Sub-Committee for Occupational Health in the Production of Artificial Fibres.
The Physical Object
Pagination271p.
Number of Pages271
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL14063658M

This papre describes a simple method of carbon disulphide determination in the air of working environment in the chemical companies and plants after its absorption into aprotic N,N-dimethylformamide solvent. Carbon disulphide absorbed into aprotic solvent was transformed by using ammonium hydroxide on sulphides which were determined by spectrophotometry. 5,5′-Dithiobis(2 Cited by: 5. carbon disulphide Ingredient name % CAS number There are no additional ingredients present which, within the current knowledge of the supplier and in the concentrations applicable, are classified as hazardous to health or the environment and hence require reporting in this section. Chemical name:carbon disulphide Other means of.

  “The book is well researched and clearly written, with a passionate concern for the impact of carbon disulphide on workers this book will be very appealing to scholars as well as to general readers interested in the history of the rayon industry, the history of occupational health, or the unbridled use of toxic materials by industry.   Fake Silk is a social history of the world wide experience of rayon production and the toxic effects of carbon disulphide. It is aimed at a broad audience including those interested in the textiles industry, the history of labour relations, consumer and environmental protection, as well as occupational health : Ron McCaig.

Carbon disulphide easily forms explosive mixtures with air and catches fire very easily; it is dangerous when exposed to heat, flame, sparks, or friction. Carbon disulfide has been an important industrial chemical since the late nineteenth century. “The book is well researched and clearly written, with a passionate concern for the impact of carbon disulphide on workers this book will be very appealing to scholars as well as to general readers interested in the history of the rayon industry, the history of occupational health, or the unbridled use of toxic materials by industry Cited by: 2.


Share this book
You might also like
We the people

We the people

Political institutions in Virginia, 1619-1660.

Political institutions in Virginia, 1619-1660.

negro in modern American history textbooks.

negro in modern American history textbooks.

Shah Rukh can

Shah Rukh can

Some Conventions of Standard Written English

Some Conventions of Standard Written English

structure of State legal services

structure of State legal services

Amendments to Communications Act of 1934

Amendments to Communications Act of 1934

Wild pastures

Wild pastures

SSRC survey archive

SSRC survey archive

Female farmers, mothers-in-law and extension agents

Female farmers, mothers-in-law and extension agents

How to Read a Person

How to Read a Person

Jordans employment law precedents

Jordans employment law precedents

The Easy Sin

The Easy Sin

Remembering Our Rose Streets

Remembering Our Rose Streets

Toxicology of carbon disulphide by International Symposium on Toxicology of Carbon Disulphide (1966 Prague) Download PDF EPUB FB2

Toxicology of carbon disulphide: Proceedings of [an international] symposium, Prague, Sept. (Excerpta Medica monograph series) [Brieger, Heinrich] on *FREE* shipping Toxicology of carbon disulphide book qualifying offers.

Toxicology of carbon disulphide: Proceedings of [an international] symposium, Prague, Sept. (Excerpta Medica monograph series). The ATSDR toxicological profile succinctly characterizes the toxicologic and adverse health effects information for the hazardous substance described here.

Each peer-reviewed profile identifies and reviews the key literature that describes a hazardous substance's toxicologic properties. Other pertinent literature is also presented, but is described in less detail than the key studies.

Pure carbon disulfide is a colorless liquid with a pleasant odor that is like the smell of chloroform. The impure carbon disulfide that is usually used in most industrial processes is a yellowish liquid with an unpleasant odor, like that of rotting radishes.

Carbon disulfide evaporates at room temperature, and the vapor is more than twice as heavy as air. Get this from a library. Toxicology of carbon disulphide: proceedings of a symposium, Prague, September 15thth, [Heinrich Brieger; Permanent Commission and International Association on Occupational Health.

Sub-committee for Occupational Health in the Production of Artificial Fibres.;]. COVID Resources. Reliable information about the coronavirus (COVID) is available from the World Health Organization (current situation, international travel).Numerous and frequently-updated resource results are available from this ’s WebJunction has pulled together information and resources to assist library staff as they consider how to handle coronavirus.

Carbon disulfide is used in the viscose industry to prepare cotton, rayon, and other materials. World production is about 1 mil tons per year. Toxicology. Carbon disulfide attacks the central nervous system, and in acute cases acts as a narcotic which is swiftly followed by death.

Tracy J. Eicher, in Clinical Neurotoxicology, Carbon Disulfide. Carbon disulfide is used industrially in the manufacture of perfumes, cellophane, rayon, and some types of rubber. It is also present in varnish, solvents, and insecticides.

Inhalation in an occupational setting is the most common source of toxicity, although transdermal absorption is also a danger. Data on the effects of exposure to CS 2 are summarized in Table Uncontrolled Exposure. According to Bittersohl et al. (), exposure to CS 2 at ppm produces slight symptoms of poisoning after several hours; at ppm, it gives rise to prenarcotic symptoms; at 1, ppm for 30 min, it leads to severe forms of poisoning; and at 3,–3, ppm, it is life-threatening.

Carbon disulfide Hazard Summary Exposure to carbon disulfide occurs mainly in the workplace. Acute (short-term) inhalation exposure of humans to carbon disulfide has caused changes in breathing and chest pains.

Nausea, vomiting, dizziness, fatigue, headache, mood changes, lethargy, blurred vision, delirium, and convulsions have also been. Carbon disulfide is a colorless liquid that evaporates rapidly at room temperature. As ofBlanc could only find the compound mentioned in a.

SUSAN N.J. MARTEL, Senior Program Officer for Toxicology KULBIR S. BAKSHI, Senior Program Officer ELLEN K. MANTUS, Senior Program Officer RUTH E.

CROSSGROVE, Senior Editor 1This study was planned, overseen, and s upported by the Board on Environmental Stud-ies and Toxicology. CS2 is not a natural constituent of the environment and was discovered in the laboratory in Its narcotic effects were tested in and industrial use began in First used as a solvent for phosphorus in the manufacture of matches, CS2 was later used as a solvent for fats, lacquers, and camphor; for refining paraffins and petroleum; for the extraction of natural oils, and, most.

The patient presented also serves as a remainder that neurodegenerative disorders of apparently unknown origin sometimes derive from occupational toxic exposures suffered in the past.

[] Clinical presentation Acute carbon disulfide exposure can cause eye and skin irritation and CNS depression. [] Deeply researched and boldly presented, this book brings to.

Other animal data: RD 50 (mouse), >81, ppm [AIHA ]. Other human data: Symptoms have occurred after 30 minutes of exposure to concentrations ranging from to ppm while exposure to 4, ppm for 30 minutes causes coma and may be fatal [Flury and Zernik ]. Severe symptoms and unconsciousness may occur within 30 minutes at 1, ppm [Patty ].

Carbon disulphide: incident management Ref: PHE publications gateway number PDF, KB, 15 pages This file may not be suitable for users of assistive technology. In: Brieger H, Teisinger J (eds) Toxicology of carbon disulfide.

Excerpta Medica Foundation, Amsterdam, pp – Google Scholar World Health Organization () Environmental health criteria. Volume 2 of the 3rd edition of Patty's industrial hygiene and toxicology, also edited by the Claytons, will deal with toxicology and is to be in three parts.

Volume 1 [Abstr. Hyg.55, abstr. 25] had 27 chapters by different authors but Volume 2A has only 11 chapters. The first of these chapters, by J. ZAPP (p. ), is headed Industrial toxicology: retrospect and prospect; the other Cited by: Carbon disulfide is only slightly toxic to laboratory animals by inhalation or ingestion, but its toxicity is relatively greater in humans.

Exposure to ppm of carbon disulfide for 15 minutes can be fatal to humans. Carbon disulfide may also exert its toxic effects after absorption through skin. Carbon disulfide is a colorless volatile liquid with the formula CS 2. The compound is used frequently as a building block in organic chemistry as well as an industrial and chemical non-polar solvent.

It has an "ether-like" odor, but commercial samples are typically contaminated with foul-smelling al formula: CS₂. Carbon disulfide (CS2) is a colorless liquid with an ether-like odor. Exposure can cause dizziness, poor sleep, headache, anxiety, anorexia, weight loss, and vision changes.

It can harm the eyes, kidneys, blood, heart, liver, nerves, and skin. Workers may be harmed by carbon disulfide. The level of exposure depends upon the dose, duration, and work being done.

The primary purpose of this chapter is to provide public health officials, physicians, toxicologists, and other interested individuals and groups with an overall perspective on the toxicology of carbon monoxide.

It contains descriptions and evaluations of toxicological studies and epidemiological investigations and provides conclusions, where possible, on the relevance of toxicity and.

OEHHA believes the proposed action level of ug/L (ppb) of carbon disulfide is protective of human health given long term exposure for the following reasons. The most sensitive, significant endpoint has been selected to derive the action level, and to that a fold uncertainty factor has been added.The neurotoxic effects of prenatal organosolvent inhalation were studied in rats, Part of the Archives of Toxicology book series (TOXICOLOGY, volume 8) and the well known neurotoxic carbon disulphide, would impair reflex ontogeny or produce neurobehavioural dysfunctions Cited by: 7.